Life Lessons From the Bhagavad Gita

The Bhagavad Gita, literally translated as the ‘Song Of God’, is a part of the immense Indian epic, the Mahabharata, a story of the enmity and ensuing war between the Pandavas and the Kauravas. The Gita, as it is also called, enjoys an exalted position in India’s culture and philosophical milieu. This brilliant chronicle is regarded as the highest philosophy in the Hindu pantheon.

Bhagavd Gita shows path to the lost, answer to the confused and wisdom to all. It is considered to be one of the greatest spiritual books the world has ever known. The primary purpose of the Bhagavad- Gita is to illuminate for all of humanity the realization of the true nature of divinity; for the highest spiritual conception and the greatest material perfection is to attain love of God!

Some of the teachings of the Gita are as follows:

Thoughts about big or small, your or mine should be kept out.

Source: Google
Source: Google

Money mind can not meditate.

Source: Google
Source: Google

Desires come and go.

Source: Google
Source: Google

We did not bring anything to this world, neither are we going to take anything.

Source: Google
Source: Google

Progress and development are the rules of this universe.

Source: Google
Source: Google

Whatever happened was good, whatever is happening is good and what all will happen in the future will be good.

Source: Google
Source: Google

World is perishable and whoever comes to this world surely has to go one day.

Source: Google
Source: Google

Soul is immortal and our body is perishable. Our soul never dies.

Source: Google
Source: Google

We should do our work without worrying about it’s result, which is also called NISHKAMAKARMA. (About which Gunjan Talreja, guest writer, will be talking on the 24th of October).

sri_krishna_janmashtami157

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Life Lessons From the Bhagavad Gita

  1. While I too, hold our spiritual books such as the Gita in high regard, I do not agree with all their teachings. I suggest you read novels by Ayn Rand, especially Atlas shrugged to get a counter view. (Since the novel is longer than an average text, you can at least read the speech on money by one of the characters- Francisco.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve read Ayn Rand earlier, and I too do not agree to all the teachings of the Gita. Even the ones I’ve listed have been written after asking many people. I do believe in God, and I too regard the holy books in high regard, but I think there is always more to life. I think that if there is anything we can learn, then it is only through human experiences!
      I respect your opinion as much as I respect mine!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s